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browsing browsing newscientist lagi

Robotic wheels that just keep rolling

A gaggle of miniature robots are falling over themselves in a Japanese lab. But they are not malfunctioning: it is the way they have been designed to move. The wheel-shaped robots, which are just 4 centimetres in diameter and 1 centimetre thick, were built by Shinichi Hirai and Yuuta Sugiyama at Ritsumeikan University in Kusatsu. The robots propel themselves along by continuously altering their shape. Shape memory alloys store energy in the form of stresses in their crystalline structure. Passing an electric current through the spokes heats them up, releasing this energy and making them shorter. Allowing them to cool then returns the spokes to their original state.

http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996095




Evolution could speed net downloads

Internet download speeds could be improved dramatically by mimicking Darwin's evolution to "breed" the best networking strategies, say computer scientists. Transferring popular data across the internet repeatedly can be inefficient and costly, so networking companies have developed ways of temporarily storing, or "caching", data at different locations to reduce costs and increase download speeds.

http://www.newscientist.com/news/print.jsp?id=ns99996112

“browsing browsing newscientist lagi”